[Book Logo] The Distributed Library Project
Welcome!
[Bullet] Login
[Bullet] Create Account
[Bullet] Find New Stuff

Find Books
[Bullet] Search/Browse
[Bullet] Sections
[Bullet] New Books

Find Videos
[Bullet] Search/Browse
[Bullet] Genres
[Bullet] New Videos

Find Music
[Bullet] Search/Browse
[Bullet] Genres
[Bullet] New Music

Info and Help
[Bullet] Contact DLP
[Bullet] Site News
[Bullet] Software
Title:
The Grand Chessboard: American Primacy and Its Geostrategic Imperatives
Author: Brzezinski, Zbigniew K.
Section: Politics
Owner: solenodon (Rating: 2)
Address: Login to view account details.
Status: Available [Check Out]
Owner Review: From Amazon:

"I read this book with disbelief. Brzezinski was for a long time a strategist, a political planner of the highest rank so I have to take him seriously. But I couldn't help but constantly wonder if the book is for real. It displays an unabashed and unapologetic view of the U.S. as a world 'hegemon' (author's word) and divides the rest of the world in 'vassals' (author's word), rivals, 'pivots' and strategically irrelevant countries. Western Europe and Japan are the prominent members of the first category, Russia and China of the second. The pivots are the countries that have strategic choices important to the U.S., such as the Ukraine. United Kingdom is an (amusing) example of strategically irrelevance.The book proceeds by systematically and often tediously analyzing case-by-case scenarios and what-ifs concerning the strategic impact of the policy decisions of the players (vassals, rivals and pivots) in four main theatres: Europe, Russia, Central Asia and the Far East. The analysis seemed rather un-principled to me but by the end I could discern some key points. The most important of them is that the U.S., despite is global hegemony cannot afford wars but it has to maintain its dominance by smartly playing the rivals against each other so that a major global rival does not emerge.I think the book's shocking disregard of democracy and national self-determination is quite consistent with the way the American administration tends to act in international affairs. Unfortunately, the current administration does not seem to take the book's main advice regarding the need for America to avoid outright wars and to dominate through smart diplomacy."

User Reviews (Write a review!)
None currently listed.

Checkout History
No Checkout History