[Book Logo] The Distributed Library Project
Welcome!
[Bullet] Login
[Bullet] Create Account
[Bullet] Find New Stuff

Find Books
[Bullet] Search/Browse
[Bullet] Sections
[Bullet] New Books

Find Videos
[Bullet] Search/Browse
[Bullet] Genres
[Bullet] New Videos

Find Music
[Bullet] Search/Browse
[Bullet] Genres
[Bullet] New Music

Info and Help
[Bullet] Contact DLP
[Bullet] Site News
[Bullet] Software
Title:
Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs - 2nd Edition (MIT Electrical Engineering and Computer Science)
Author: Abelson, Harold
Section: Computers
Owner: necco (Rating: 0)
Address: Login to view account details.
Status: Available [Check Out]
Owner Review: From Amazon:

"The negative reviewers entirely missed the point of this book. The issues are not c++ versus scheme, nor the gap between the book's examples and real-world programs, nor that recursion is less intuitive than looping.The real point is to teach some very core foundations of computer science that show up everywhere. For example, supposedly revolutionary XML looks a heck of a lot like a nested scheme list, first described in 1960. And processing an active server page (or Java server page) is very much like the textbook's specialized language evaluator. Finally, c++ polymorphism through vtables and part of Microsoft's COM mechanics are the exact same thing as the book's data-directed programming section.This is very deep material for a programming newbie to learn outside a course, but for an experienced nerd who's looking for a systematic framework, it's absolutely terrific. I had done lots of lisp and compiler work before reading the book, so many of the concepts were not new. But it's with this framework in mind that I learn new technologies, and this approach greatly speeds up how long it takes to understand each week's "new" hot product/language/tool/mindset. Put another way: why do so many popular computer books take 1000 pages to describe a few trivial concepts?"

User Reviews (Write a review!)
Review by uddhav_info10 (Rating: 0)
a

Checkout History
No Checkout History